Surgeries

obstetric surgery

Obstetric surgery

- Cesarian sections? A Cesarian section (often C-section, also other spellings) is a surgical procedure in which one or more incisions are made through a mother's abdomen and uterus to deliver one or more babies. A Caesarean section is often performed when a vaginal delivery would put the baby's or mother's life or health at risk. Some are also performed upon request without a medical reason to do so. The World Health Organization recommends that they should only be done based on medical need.



Uses:
A 7-week old Caesarean section scar and linea nigra visible on a 31-year-old mother.

Caesarean section is recommended when vaginal delivery might pose a risk to the mother or baby. C-sections are also carried out for personal preference but this is not recommended[by whom?]. Planned caesarean sections also known as elective caesarean sections should not be scheduled before 39 weeks gestational age unless there is a medical reason to do so.
Ectopic pregnancy(Pregnancy in the tubes)
Ectopic pregnancy, also known as eccyesis or tubal pregnancy, is a complication of pregnancy in which the embryo attaches outside the uterus. Signs and symptoms classically include abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. Less than 50% of women however have both these symptoms. The pain may be described as sharp, dull, or crampy. Pain may also spread to the shoulder if bleeding into the abdomen has occurred. Severe bleeding may result in a fast heart rate, fainting, or shock. With very rare exceptions the fetus is unable to survive.
Obstetric Hysterectomy:
Obstetrics and gynaecology (or obstetrics and gynecology; often abbreviated to OB/GYN, OBG, O&G or Obs & Gynae) is the medical speciality dealing with fields of obstetrics and gynaecology through only one postgraduate training programme. This combined training prepares the practicing OB/GYN to be adept at the care of female reproductive organs's health and at the management of obstetric complications, even through surgery.

Gynecological surgery

Gynecological surgery refers to surgery on the female reproductive system. Gynecological surgery is usually performed by gynecologists. It includes procedures for benign conditions, cancer, infertility, and incontinence. Gynecological surgery may occasionally be performed for elective or cosmetic purposes.

  • Total abdominal Hysterectomy
  • Abdominal hysterectomy is a surgical procedure that removes your uterus through an incision in your lower abdomen. Your uterus — or womb — is where a baby grows if you're pregnant. A partial hysterectomy removes just the uterus, and a total hysterectomy removes the uterus and the cervix.
    Sometimes a hysterectomy includes removal of one or both ovaries and fallopian tubes, a procedure called total hysterectomy with salpingo-oophorectomy.
    Hysterectomy can also be performed through an incision in the vagina (vaginal hysterectomy) or by a laparoscopic or robotic surgical approach — which uses long, thin instruments passed through small abdominal incisions. Abdominal hysterectomy may be recommended over other types of hysterectomy if you have a large uterus or if your doctor wants to check other pelvic organs for signs of disease.

  • Vaginal Hysterectomy
  • Vaginal hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the uterus through the vagina. During a vaginal hysterectomy, the surgeon detaches the uterus from the ovaries, fallopian tubes and upper vagina, as well as from the blood vessels and connective tissue that support it. The uterus is then removed through the vagina.
    Vaginal hysterectomy involves a shorter time in the hospital, lower cost and faster recovery than an abdominal hysterectomy, which requires an incision in your lower abdomen. However, if your uterus is enlarged, vaginal hysterectomy may not be possible.
    Hysterectomy often includes removal of the cervix as well as the uterus. When the surgeon also removes one or both ovaries and fallopian tubes, it's called a total hysterectomy with salpingo-oophorectomy (sal-ping-go-o-of-uh-REK-tuh-me). Located in your pelvis, all these organs are part of your reproductive system.

  • Ovarian cyst Removal
  • Fibroid removal
  • Uterine fibroids are benign tumours that are made up of the muscle and connective tissue from the wall of the uterus (womb). Fibroids may grow as a single nodule or in clusters and may range in size from one millimetre to more than 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter. They may grow within the wall of the uterus or they may project into the interior cavity or toward the outer surface of the uterus. In rare cases, they may grow on stems projecting from the surface of the uterus. What causes uterine fibroids?
    The causes of fibroids are not known. Most fibroids occur in women of reproductive age, and according to some estimates, they are diagnosed in black women two to three times more frequently than in white women. They are seldom seen in young women who have not begun to menstruate, and they usually stabilise or go away in women after menopause. Are fibroids cancer?
    No. Fibroids are not associated with cancer. They are benign tumours that almost never develop into cancer.
    Who is at risk of uterine fibroids?
    No risk factors have been found for uterine fibroids other than being a female of reproductive age. However, some studies suggest obese women are at increased risk of having fibroids. (A person is considered obese if he or she has a BMI of 30 or over.) Those women who’ve had children appear to be less likely to develop fibroids. What are the symptoms of uterine fibroids?
    Most fibroids do not cause any symptoms and do not require treatment other than regular observation by a doctor. Fibroids may be discovered during routine gynecological examinations or during antenatal care. Some women who have uterine fibroids may experience the following symptoms:

    • Excessive or painful bleeding during menstruation.
    • Bleeding between periods.
    • A feeling of fullness in the lower abdomen.
    • Frequent urination resulting from a fibroid that compresses the bladder.
    • Pain during sexual intercourse
    • Lower back pain

  • Cancer Surgery
  • Surgery for Gynecologic Cancer

    • Cervix
    • Uterus
    • Ovaries
    • Other Pelvic Organs
    The Magee-Womens Gynecologic Cancer Program in Pittsburgh, Pa., offers the latest surgical treatment options for gynecologic cancers.
    Our expert surgeons will:
    • Evaluate the size and location of your tumor. Attempt to remove as much of the tumor as possible. Reducing the size of the tumor improves the efficiency of subsequent chemotherapy and radiation therapy, since there is less tumor to treat.
    • Guide you to the appropriate surgical procedure for your type of gynecologic cancer.
    In some cases, surgeons may also perform a colostomy — a temporary or permanent surgical procedure that alters the way stool is passed. Types of Surgery for Gynecologic Cancers.

laparoscopic operation

Laparascopic surgery

Laparoscopy is a surgery which consist of introducing a small penlike instrument from the umbilicus following anaesthesia.This instrument is attached to a camera which has a monitor .This monitor helps to visualize the internal organs and to record the findings. During this procedure the surgeon can treat number of pathology like ovarian cysts,adhesions,endometriosis, fibroids etc.

Pilot Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy is the inspection of the uterine cavity by endoscopy with access through the cervix. It allows for the diagnosis of intrauterine pathology and serves as a method for surgical intervention (operative hysteroscopy).

A hysteroscope is an endoscope that carries optical and light channels or fibers. It is introduced in a sheath that provides an inflow and outflow channel for insufflation of the uterine cavity. In addition, an operative channel may be present to introduce scissors, graspers or biopsy instruments. A hysteroscopic resectoscope is similar to a transurethral resectoscope and allows entry of an electric loop to shave off tissue, for instance to eliminate a fibroid. A contact hysteroscope is a hysteroscope that does not use distention media.
Procedure
Hysteroscopy has been done in the hospital, surgical centers and the office. It is best done when the endometrium is relatively thin, that is after a menstruation. Diagnostic can easily be done in an office or clinic setting. Local anesthesia can be used. Simple operative hysteroscopy can also be done in an office or clinic setting. Analgesics are not always necessary. A paracervical block may be used using a Lidocaine injection in the upper part of the cervix. The patient is in a lithotomy position during the procedure. Hysteroscopic intervention can also be done under general anesthesia (endotracheal or laryngeal mask) or Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC). Prophylactic antibiotics are not necessary.

Mothercare Hospital

(A.R.T. - Assisted Reproductive Technology Centre)
(I.V.F. - In-Vitro Fertilization Test Tube Baby )
Mantri Co-op Society,
Plot No. 34-35,
S.No. 585, Salisbury Park,
Pune 37.
Phone: +020 242611182
Email: Chyyosada@yahoo.com

Visiting Hours


Monday - Saturday 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

*Sunday Closed

Dr.Sada Multi-speciality Hospital



Vastushree Commercial Complex,
S.No. 39-42,
Next to Hyde Park, Market Yard,
Pune 37.
Phone: +020 41273990/91
Email: Chyyosada@yahoo.com

Visiting Hours


Monday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

*Sunday Closed (Available by Appointments only)

Locate Us